Galactica (TOS-RH)

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This article is in the Richard Hatch continuation separate continuity, which is related to the Original Series. Be sure that your contributions to this article reflect the characters and events specific to this continuity only.
For the ship in the Original Series canon, from which this ship is based, see: Galactica (TOS). For other uses, see: Galactica (disambiguation).

Galactica is the last known surviving battlestar, which leads the "Rag-Tag Fugitive Fleet" on a lonely quest to find Earth.

Built about 6842, Galactica differs from other battlestars of her ilk with the addition of a sanctuary, built and hidden in secret as directed by members of the House of Kobol (RH: Armageddon).

Despite the brief reunion of Commander Cain's Pegasus, survivors of the human race believe Galactica to be the last known battlestar to survive the Cylons' assault against the Colonies themselves, until a later reunion with this battleship after 7360 (RH: Warhawk).

Layout

Quarters

Galactica's crew quarters are compartmentalized: ship's crew and infantry are on a singular deck, distinctly separate and distant from the pilots berths. The pilots' quarters were situated in close proximity to the launch bays, to facilitate rapid deployment.

The officers' wing of the crew and infantry deck features warm green walls, adorned with lamps set every few metrons for aesthetics rather than practical illumination.[1]

At the time of Adama's passing in 7360, the commander's quarters, while located on this singular deck, featured no signage identifying said quarters as his, a tradition that Apollo agreed with. The commander of the battlestar was expected to take up residence in said quarters, likely due to its proximity of a secret and well-hidden sanctuary that can only be accessed through the commander's quarters.[1]

Sanctuary

Accessible only through the commander's quarters via a door that, in any other compartment, would have been mistaken for a closet door was a Kobollian sanctuary. This private sanctuary was a storehouse of surviving Kobollian knowledge, doubling as a place for meditation and the practice of Kobollian mental arts for metamorphosing into a higher state of consciousness, and built into Galactica in secret.

Within the oval room is a tall antique wooden chair, the only item Apollo felt gave off warmth, particularly in stark contrast of the smooth, cold surroundings that both gleamed and shimmered. The walls of the sanctuary are adorned with drawn star maps originating from legend, featuring not only the Twelve Colonies of Man, but also Kobol and the solar system of Earth. These drawings were illuminated by the Kobollian computer, the centerpiece of the room.

This centerpiece computer features technology outpacing the Colonial technology of seventh millenium, its output only holographic in nature and featuring the ability to record messages in three-dimensional holographic form, such as the final message that Adama recorded for his son. Aesthetically the computer hued to organic forms, featuring a glittering gold and silver shell and with "sides curving up as if to embrace the user."[2]

Enhancements

Throughout the 18 yahren since the Battle at Galaxy's Edge in "The Hand of God", Galactica has been upgraded with new technologies.

Its computer systems and instrumentation are controlled by voice commands, which is introduced in "Murder on the Rising Star". The computer systems are also automated, with each console having both a flatscreen and holographic functions. On the bridge, the voice response programs were keyed to individual voices, so as to avoid conflicting voice commands from other officers within earshot. As of 7360, those features were still being tested, but were functional enough for military use.[3]


References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Hatch, Richard; Christopher Golden (1997). Armaggedon. Byron Preiss, p. pg. 50.
  2. Hatch, Richard; Christopher Golden (1997). Armaggedon. Byron Preiss, p. pg. 53.
  3. Hatch, Richard; Christopher Golden (1997). Armaggedon. Byron Preiss, p. pg. 37.