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== See also ==
== See also ==


* [[:Media:The Identity of Cylons.pdf|"'I'm Sharon, but a Different Kind of Sharon': The Identity of Cylons"]], by Amy Kind. An [http://www.bestessays.co.uk/ essay] from the book provided by [[Jason T. Eberl]].
* [[:Media:The Identity of Cylons.pdf|"'I'm Sharon, but a [http://www.diamondlinks.net/ link building service] Different Kind of Sharon': The Identity of Cylons"]], by Amy Kind. An [http://www.essaywriter.co.uk/essay.aspx essay] from the book provided by [[Jason T. Eberl]].


==References==
==References==

Revision as of 10:42, 18 June 2011

This article describes a book by Jason T. Eberl. For a general analysis of the series's philosophical aspects, see Philosophy in Battlestar Galactica. For the book from Open Court Publishing, see Battlestar Galactica and Philosophy: Mission Accomplished or Mission Frakked Up?.


Battlestar Galactica and Philosophy: Knowledge Here Begins Out There
Battlestar Galactica and Philosophy: Knowledge Here Begins Out There
A book of the Blackwell Publishing line
Book No. 1
Author(s) Jason T. Eberl
Adaptation of
No. of Pages 224
Published January 29, 2008
ISBN 1405178140
Chronology
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none Battlestar Galactica and Philosophy: Knowledge Here Begins Out There none
Paperback Version
Available at Amazon.comPurchase
Available at Amazon.co.ukPurchase
Available at BOOKSAMILLION.COM - Purchase
Available at Half.com by eBay - Purchase
Audiobook Version
Available at iTunes – [{{{itunes}}} Purchase]


Battlestar Galactica and Philosophy: Knowledge Here Begins Out There (Blackwell Publishing, December 2007, ISBN 1405178140), edited by philosophy professor Jason T. Eberl, is a collection of several essays dealing with philosophical aspects of the Re-imagined Series, and an entry in Blackwell's Philosophy and Pop Culture Series.

According to the original call for abstracts, the essays are to be "philosophically substantial but accessible, written to engage the intelligent lay reader".[1]

Contents

  • Erik D. Baldwin: "How to be Happy after the End of the World"
  • Robert Sharp: "When Machines Get Souls: Nietzsche on the Cylon Uprising"
  • J. Robert Loftis: "“What a Strange Little Man”: Baltar the Tyrant?"
  • Jason P. Blahuta: "The Politics of Crisis: Machiavelli in the Colonial Fleet"
  • Robert Arp: “And They Have a Plan”: Cylons as Persons"
  • Tracie Mahaffey
  • Amy Kind:" “I’m Sharon, but I’m a Different Sharon”: The Identity of Cylons"
  • Jerold J. Abrams: "Embracing the “Children of Humanity”: How to Prevent the Next Cylon War"
  • Brian Willems: "When the Non-Human Knows Its Own Death"
  • Randall M. Jensen: "The Search for Starbuck: The Needs of the Many vs. the Few"
  • Andrew Terjesen: "Resistance vs. Collaboration on New Caprica: What Would You Do?"
  • George A. Dunn: "Being Boomer: Identity, Alienation, and Evil"
  • David Roden: "Cylons in the Original Position: Limits of Posthuman Justice"
  • Jason T. Eberl "“I Am an Instrument of God”: Religious Belief, Atheism, and Meaning"
  • Jennifer A. Vines
  • Taneli Kukkonen: "God against the Gods: Faith and the Exodus of the Twelve Colonies"
  • David Kyle Johnson: "“A Story That Is Told Again, and Again, and Again”: Recurrence, Providence, and Freedom"
  • Eric J. Silverman: "Adama’s True Lie: Earth and the Problem of Knowledge"
  • James McRae: "Zen and the Art of Cylon Maintenance"
  • Elizabeth F. Cooke: "“Let It Be Earth”: The Pragmatic Virtue of Hope"
  • Sarah Conly: "Is Starbuck a Woman?"
  • David Koepsell: "Gaius Baltar and the Transhuman Temptation"[2]

See also

References

  1. Call for Abstracts (backup available on Archive.org) .
  2. PhilosopherJedi (November 2007). Cylons in America (backup available on Archive.org) (in ). Retrieved on 28 January 2007.