Felix Mortinson

From Battlestar Wiki, the free, open content Battlestar Galactica encyclopedia and episode guide
For the canonical counterpart to this character from the Galactica 1980 television series, see: Donald Mortinson.
Felix Mortinson
Felix Mortinson

Name

{{{name}}}
Age {{{age}}}
Colony Earth
Birth place {{{birthplace}}}
Birth Name {{{birthname}}}
Birth Date {{{birthdate}}}
Callsign {{{callsign}}}
Nickname {{{nickname}}}
Introduced Galactica 1980 #1
Death {{{death}}}
Parents {{{parents}}}
Siblings {{{siblings}}}
Children {{{children}}}
Marital Status {{{marital status}}}
Family Tree View
Role Scientist
Rank {{{rank}}}
Serial Number {{{serial}}}
Portrayed by {{{actor}}}
Felix Mortinson is a Cylon
Felix Mortinson is a Final Five Cylon
Felix Mortinson is a Human/Cylon Hybrid
Felix Mortinson is an Original Series Cylon
Additional Information
Felix Mortinson in the separate continuity
[[Image:|200px|Felix Mortinson]]


Doctor Felix Mortinson, Ph. D. is an Earth scientist who believes in the "alien astronaut" theory and, as such, was the subject of ridicule from members of the scientific community since November of 1971 C.E. (Galactica 1980 1).

When the Colonials make contact with Earth in 1980 C.E., Mortinson is working at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico where he intercepts and is able to identify the Colonial language as having strong similarities to ancient Aramaic, a language that is over three thousand years old (Galactica 1980 2).

Mortinson later headed toward Washington, D.C. in the hope of establishing contact with the Colonials, who he correctly surmised to be brothers from the stars. He encounters Troy Adama and Troykus Adama, is able to communicate with them relatively effectively and leads them to Mount Weather, the United States' continuity bunker. By doing so, he allows Commander Adama to convince President Jimmy Carter that the Colonials were no threat, despite his ill-thought out action and Doctor Gaius Zee's invasion of Earth, and to direct their energies to the Cylons threat (Galactica 1980 34).